Forgot Your Password? There’s a Pill for That.

Password Pill

Are you always forgetting your password? Too lazy to write them all down? Too paranoid about hackers to just use one?

Well, Motorola thinks it has a solution to the password problem.  The company is working with doctors to perfect a tiny, swallowable device that stores your codes and ID in your stomach. Technology is getting creepier by the day…

In order for the pill to work you would have to provide Motorola with your password information and they would create a custom pill that had a tiny electronic chip inside it. The password pill automatically syncs up with your smartphone and can confirm your identity to every device. In theory you would never have to remember another password in your life. Somehow the pill is powered by stomach acid and emits a 18-bit, ECG-like signal.

The only catch? (Besides having your stomach become some sort of satellite..) The password pill passes through your body in 24 hours so you would have to take a pill everyday – otherwise you might forget your all your information and just end up wandering the streets aimlessly.

The password pill may seem like an overly complicated and potentially hazardous solution to a small annoyance, but Regina Dugan, senior vice president of Motorola’s Advanced Technology & Projects, thinks the password pill is a necessity that will make everyone’s life easier.

“People have to authenticate themselves (to machines) on average 39 times a day, or log into their phone 100 times a day, and coming up with hacker-proof passwords has become more insane,” Dugan explained, “Sorting this out will improve everyone’s lives.”

“I would take the pill along with my vitamin every morning. It’s my first super-power. I want that.”

Mad-scientist quotes aside, I don’t know about this password pill… What if somebody steals your pills? Can they take over your identity? And more importantly, just how does this pill “pass through your system”?

Passwords are definitely a problem – people aren’t great at creating them and people are even worse at remembering them. Maybe getting rid of passwords altogether would be a better solution – either by fingerprint authentication or eyeball scanning. Then again, I’d rather have a hacker steal my pills than cut off my finger. Then again, it might be simplest to just write my passwords down and make sure they aren’t on the ”worst passwords list”: password, 123456, 12345678, jesus, monkey, trustno1, etc.

Via: The Australian

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